Health

Can Dandelion Tea Cure Cancer?

Dandelion tea touted as possible cancer killer Trials planned at Windsor Regional Cancer Centre in Ontario CBC News  Posted: Feb 16, 2012 1:08 PM ET  Last Updated: Feb 16, 2012 2:16 PM ET  Read 66comments66 Researchers hope to test dandelion tea on patients at a Windsor, Ont., cancer clinic after it was found the roots killed cancer cells in the lab. (Pat Jeflyn/CBC) Facebook 356 Tw... »

Why Choose Mini Dental Implants

      by Benjamin D. Oppenheimer, DDS When David came in to see me he had just been laid off from work, and the prospect of going on interviews with two missing teeth was overwhelming. When he asked about mini-implants he was shocked to learn they cost 50% less than regular implants and wanted to know why. Approximately 50,000,000 people in the U.S. are “edentulous” (lacking teeth... »

Hiding in Plain Sight: Incognito Braces!

How important is your smile?  Rochester-based firm Harris Interactive polled 1,000 people ages 18-54 to explore the importance of a good smile in business, relationships, and self-esteem. The results may surprise you:  •            85% think a good smile is important in attracting a new partner •      &n... »

WNY Genome Project and What It Means to You

Imagine being able to examine your genetic makeup to determine if you are likely to develop a disease. Imagine being able to receive treatment and medication designed specifically for you in the most effective dose. One of the most important aspects of modern medicine is genetics, or the science of genes and heredity and what makes us different from one another. The genetic makeup (genome) for one... »

Managing Chronic Health Conditions Wirelessly in Buffalo

Regardless of age, sex, ethnicity, race, education or location, the number of Americans who are obese, diabetic or suffer from heart and other chronic diseases continues to rise. Now new wireless mobile technology has the potential to improve patient health and wellbeing.  And best of all – the patient doesn’t even need to operate or understand the technology, and it’s available right here in... »

When Is a Headache More Than Just a Headache?

What would cause a 34-year-old woman to waken with severe and throbbing head pain, nausea and dizziness?  A 9-year-old to have a headache lasting four months? Or an otherwise healthy 32-year-old woman to have severe headaches and seizures? These are just some of the difficult cases of severe headache pain the DENT Neurological Institute sees every day. Laszlo Mechtler, M.D., Director of DENT’... »

Potential Risk Factors for Painful Jaw Disorders are Identified In the First Large-Scale Clinical Study of Pain

— UB study finds that people who develop jaw pain disorders exhibit specific characteristics, including more trauma to the jaw, more limitations and noises in the jaw, more headaches medical status. — The findings are being published by UB School of Dental Medicine researchers who are international authorities on aspects of jaw pain disorders and who have developed through internationa... »

Medical 411: Syringomyelia and Chiari

Syringomyelia (SM) is a disorder in which a cyst forms within the spinal cord, expands and elongates over time, and destroys the center of the cord, resulting in pain, weakness, and stiffness in the back, shoulders, arms or legs. Symptoms can include headaches, inability to distinguish heat and cold, disruption in body temperature, and may adversely affect sweating, sexual function and bladder and... »

Most people feel more positive at the beginning of the day

According to a new study, if you start the day feeling positive but get increasingly sad as the day goes on, you are in the majority. The study used Twitter to track mood swings and found that people have two happiness peaks early in the morning and again at about midnight. Sociologists at Cornell University tracked tweets from more than 2 million Twitter users across the globe for over two y... »

New Hope for Alzheimer’s

For Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis and Brain Cancers, Cornell Finding May Permit Drug delivery to the Brain Cornell University researchers may have solved a 100-year puzzle: How to safely open and close the blood-brain barrier so that therapies to treat Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and cancers of the central nervous system might effectively be delivered. (Journal of Neuroscience, Sept.... »

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